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Hospitalist

By Dr. Moghissi - July 2006

Several years ago I started using a group of hospitalists to manage my patients admitted to the hospital. I had toyed with this idea for several years prior and am convinced that the benefit to my patients outweigh the disadvantages.

As a solo practitioner I realize that people come to me for personalized care, and that it is important to them that I take care of them – someone they know and are familiar with. This is especially true when they are very sick and in the hospital. That is why I hesitated for so long to do this.

I have also come to realize, though, that medicine is becoming more complex every year and I can’t do everything. I am very comfortable with almost every aspect of outpatient (office) medicine, but I became less comfortable with hospital medicine. I would admit someone to the hospital only a few times a month, and each time for a totally different problem. I felt I was falling behind on state of the art hospital medicine. There are many physicians who feel the way I do, and a new specialty evolved called hospitalists. These physicians see no outpatients, they only manage hospital patients. Once the patient is discharged from the hospital, their primary care physician takes over again.

I am using a group of hospitalists, several members of whom I have worked with for years. I have always respected their work, and as hospitalists, they have continued to practice excellent medicine. Most of them have been doing exclusively hospital work for several years now, and the group has an excellent reputation. These physicians only treat adults, but the pediatrics department at Fairfax Hospital has graciously allowed me to use their pediatric hospitalists when and if one of my pediatric patients needs to be admitted. I am continuing to see my newborn babies at Fairfax Hospital.

Almost all of the smaller practices in this area are using hospitalists now. It really makes more sense in this world of fast changing medical care, and I believe this is a way for my patients to get the best medical care possible.

Jasmine Moghissi, M.D.

Focus - Health Tips » Hospitalist

Hospitalist

By Dr. Moghissi - July 2006

Several years ago I started using a group of hospitalists to manage my patients admitted to the hospital. I had toyed with this idea for several years prior and am convinced that the benefit to my patients outweigh the disadvantages.

As a solo practitioner I realize that people come to me for personalized care, and that it is important to them that I take care of them – someone they know and are familiar with. This is especially true when they are very sick and in the hospital. That is why I hesitated for so long to do this.

I have also come to realize, though, that medicine is becoming more complex every year and I can’t do everything. I am very comfortable with almost every aspect of outpatient (office) medicine, but I became less comfortable with hospital medicine. I would admit someone to the hospital only a few times a month, and each time for a totally different problem. I felt I was falling behind on state of the art hospital medicine. There are many physicians who feel the way I do, and a new specialty evolved called hospitalists. These physicians see no outpatients, they only manage hospital patients. Once the patient is discharged from the hospital, their primary care physician takes over again.

I am using a group of hospitalists, several members of whom I have worked with for years. I have always respected their work, and as hospitalists, they have continued to practice excellent medicine. Most of them have been doing exclusively hospital work for several years now, and the group has an excellent reputation. These physicians only treat adults, but the pediatrics department at Fairfax Hospital has graciously allowed me to use their pediatric hospitalists when and if one of my pediatric patients needs to be admitted. I am continuing to see my newborn babies at Fairfax Hospital.

Almost all of the smaller practices in this area are using hospitalists now. It really makes more sense in this world of fast changing medical care, and I believe this is a way for my patients to get the best medical care possible.